In today’s
business environment, many enterprises are looking for way style="mso-spacerun: yes"> to reduce their expenses by cutting
overhead. Often this takes the form of reducing headcount, particularly in areas
that are regarded as ancillary or non-core components of the
enterprise.


Disaster Recovery and
Business Continuity often are placed in that category and, as a result, can
be an early casualty of many cost-cutting programs. Whether it is an internal Disaster Recovery and
Business Continuity  team losing
staff members, or a part-time Disaster Recovery and
Business Continuity manager with less time to spare from the day job,
Disaster Recovery and Business Continuity programs can be neglected and will
quickly become out of date and ineffective, particularly in a rapidly changing
organization. As anyone who has ever had to manage a Disaster Recovery and
Business Continuity event knows, there are few things more useless than an out
of date Disaster
Recovery and Business Continuity plan.


Of course,
it is hard to make a case for Disaster Recovery and
Business Continuity at a time when core functions are under pressure, but
maybe that is just when it should be on the radar even more than usual. With
share prices shaky and credit hard to find, the last thing any organization
needs right now is the damage to its reputation and credibility that could arise
from failing to effectively manage a high profile disruptive
incident.


Arguably,
during a recession companies are at their most vulnerable, which makes it the
worst time to neglect anything, which contributes to resilience or reduces risk.
However, if an organization is under financial pressure, how can it square the
circle and achieve those reductions in overhead costs while still maintaining
the effectiveness of its Disaster Recovery and
Business Continuity program.

Resources
Post Your Resume to 65+ Job Sites
Resume Service

Post to Twitter Tweet This Post


Popular Tags:
 functions   reputation   organizations   environments   disasters   managers   disaster recovery   overheads   electronic components